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PHILADELPHIA — Filling food boxes and singing the Philadelphia Eagles fight song, “Fly, Eagles, Fly,” President Joe Biden returned to Philadel…

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FILE - Water laps the bottom level of four homes in Harbor Island, S.C., Saturday, Oct. 30, 2021, which had to be abandoned after years of beach erosion and damage from Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Facing state budgets that are flush with cash, Democratic and Republican governors alike want to spend part of their windfalls on projects aimed at slowing climate change and guarding against its consequences, from floods and fires to cleaning up dirty air. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

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FILE - An irrigation canal that runs through land farmed by Tempe Farming Co., in Casa Grande, Ariz., is shown without water, Thursday, July 22, 2021. The Colorado River has been a go-to source of water for cities, tribes and farmers in the U.S. West for decades. Facing state budgets that are flush with cash, Democratic and Republican governors alike want to spend part of their windfalls on projects aimed at slowing climate change and guarding against its consequences, from floods and fires to cleaning up dirty air. (AP Photo/Darryl Webb, File)

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FILE - South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster talks about rising floodwaters after Florence struck the Carolinas, Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, near Wallace, S.C. Facing state budgets that are flush with cash, Democratic and Republican governors alike want to spend part of their windfalls on projects aimed at slowing climate change and guarding against its consequences, from floods and fires to cleaning up dirty air. (AP Photo/Sean Rayford, File)