Thumbs down to teens ensnared in the "Janesville Tea" incident. The victims in this case showed a total lack of judgment by taking nude photos of themselves or allowing others to do so. Janesville police referred a 14-year-old to juvenile authorities June 11 on a sexual exploitation charge for her alleged role in creating a "Janesville Tea" Snapchat account that invited peers to share nude photos. Some of the photos and videos were of people who said they didn't intend their photos to be shared publicly. One teen told police she took a nude photo of herself and sent it to a "trusted" friend and sent another to a boy who liked her. This was a preventable crime. Teens, don't take or share nude photos of yourselves. For any reason. Ever.

Thumbs down to not noticing emergency vehicles. Witnesses say a Janesville police SUV-type squad car had its lights and sirens activated when another car collided with it at the Milton Avenue and Highway 14 intersection Wednesday. We don't know what the driver of the car was doing, but witnesses say other drivers noticed the police squad coming and slowed down or stopped. It's amazing this type of accident doesn't happen more often amid a distracted-driving epidemic, whether because of drivers eating their lunch behind the wheel, blasting music or peeking at their phones. Police officers put their lives at risk whenever they confront the criminal element. Sadly, drivers not paying attention to the road are also a threat.

Thumbs up to Birds Eye. Local officials say bad odors emanating from the vegetable processor's facility in Darien have subsided in recent months. In the past, we've been critical of the company's failure to contain these bad smells, so this is a welcomed development. A decline in the number of complaints the company received this month--five versus more than 40 in June 2018--provides proof of progress. It's possible cooler weather has helped subdue odors, but local officials also think measures taken by the company, namely the installation of aerators in lagoons holding wastewater, discourage the breakdown of odor-causing organic compounds. The company says it's still researching additional options for treating wastewater.

Thumbs up to successful SHINE test. It wasn't front-page news, but a successful test at SHINE Medical Technologies' test facility in Janesville further confirms the viability of the technology the company is using to create the medical isotope molybdenum 99. Doubts about the company's ability to reach production stage have given way to optimism, and this successful test further boosts our confidence in SHINE's business model. According to the company, a neutron-generating particle accelerator of the type used to make moly-99 not only meets but exceeds the output required to launch full-scale moly-99 production. We don't claim to understand all the science behind the endeavor, but the reports we've been receiving lately point to progress.

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