Thumbs up to YMCA hiring a new CEO. The YMCA of Northern Rock County looks ready to put behind it the era of former CEO Tom Den Boer. The YMCA board of directors announced last week the hiring of Angie Bolson as new CEO. She has a long career with the Y, starting as a camp counselor 20 years ago. The Y is working to rebuild relationships damaged by Den Boer, and its involvement in last month's Tour of America's Dairyland demonstrated the Y's sincerity. Under Den Boer, the Y had nothing to do with the race, but this year the Y opened its doors to racers and their families. The Y also opened its parking lot to spectators, giving them a ringside seat for the race.

Thumbs down to new CEO not sharing her salary. Bolson did make a mistake, however, in refusing to disclose her salary to The Gazette. She should know that Den Boer's salary of $316,640 was an issue in the community. If she is being paid less, which we assume she is, she should extinguish that flame of concern by coming clean about her pay. Her refusal was reminiscent of Den Boer's responses to inquiries into how he managed the Y. Indeed, Den Boer's failure to act in a transparent manner contributed to the upheaval that led to his departure. We eventually will find out from IRS filings how much Bolson is being paid and will report it. Bolson's arrival should be applauded, but the Y has more work to do to regain the public's trust.

Thumbs up to Evers signing budget. His partial vetoes directed millions of more dollars to public education, but Evers largely kept the 2019-21 budget intact. Some people wondered whether Evers would veto the entire document--something a governor hasn't done in more than 80 years--and he wisely avoided deploying the nuclear option. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald sounded triumphant, stating Evers "basically signed a Republican version of the budget today." But that’s probably not what Fitzgerald’s colleague, Sen. Steve Nass, R-La Grange, thinks. He voted against the Republican budget, calling it "a budget document filled with excessive and unsustainable spending levels." So who won: the Republicans or Evers? Neither side would likely admit it, but they appear to have achieved a compromise.

Thumbs down to vetoing Tesla provision. We thought Wisconsin wanted to become the Silicon Valley of the Midwest. That's how some officials branded the state last year after landing a massive Foxconn plant to make LCD panels. But if the state wants to be anything like Silicon Valley, it needs to welcome Tesla. It represents the future of transportation, and its business model requires selling directly to consumers, which is currently against the law in Wisconsin. The Republican plan to open Wisconsin to Elon Musk's company would have demonstrated the state is serious about welcoming innovators. Unfortunately, Evers nixed this budget provision. We encourage Tesla and its fans to keep trying. Eventually, the free market will prevail.

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