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As the Senate impeachment trial unfolds, we’re witnessing an alarming dual justice system whereby Democrats accuse the president and the Republican Party of criminal wrongdoing and foul play while giving themselves a pass for the very same acts of which they accuse others.

As we Americans celebrate the beginning of a new decade, we continue to allow a serious challenge to escalate to crisis proportions. It is the national debt—$23.2 trillion as 2020 began.

The U.S. House Judiciary Committee approved a bill to punt to the states the prohibition or any control of marijuana. The bill removes cannabis from the long-standing Controlled Substance Act, which “schedules” marijuana as a dangerous drug, has a high potential for abuse and has no medical …

Just shy of two years ago, this column explored the heightened importance of open government when public health is at risk. Multiple examples showed the government was not sharing timely information with the public, or even other branches of government, on issues such as clean drinking water…

Regarding the movement of equity prices, we associate with the words of Alan “Ace” Greenberg, the head of Bear Stearns during the 1987 market crash: “Stocks fluctuate, next question.” The good news in 2019 is that mostly they fluctuated up, which offers a lesson or two.

All too often, bad ideas never really go away in Washington. Congress merely reduces taxpayer funding for them, without insisting they be abandoned. That may be the fate of President Donald Trump’s “Space Force.”

Fasten your seat belts, 2020 is just two days away. We predict it is likely to be a barn-burner festooned with all sorts of political chicanery, attack ads and half-truths—and maybe even some foreign meddling—as we march off to the polls for a bevy of elections, including a presidential one.

In recent months, our country has been captivated by the impeachment process and its upcoming Senate trial. Every news channel, every talk radio station and every newspaper spent time extensively covering contentious hearings in the House of Representatives—and for good reason. This process …

Every decade eventually succumbs to a tidy political and cultural shorthand. Quick, picture the 1960s, ’70s or ’80s. The societal struggles of the time spring to mind, straightforward and clear. Like it or not, so do the fashions and hairstyles.

Few places in the United States need fresh blood more than North Dakota, whose infinitesimal unemployment rate—it has more than three jobs available for every in-state applicant—reflects the state’s oil boom. That didn’t stop local officials in Burleigh County, which includes the state capit…

As the Congress is immersed in a bitter rift over the impeachment of President Trump, a bipartisan majority of the 535 federal lawmakers who roam the halls of the House and Senate agreed on one big thing this week: spending $1.4 trillion on discretionary programs for the coming fiscal year.

Virtually ignored in the impeachment haze, the U.S. House has passed common-sense legislation that finally would give the federal government the power to negotiate lower prescription drug prices with pharmaceutical companies for Medicare patients. Yet President Donald Trump has threatened to…

The original part of our farmhouse was built by my great-grandparents; it’s full of memories. One of my earliest memories dates to the middle-1960s when we were visiting on butchering day. My uncle Leland Clair had a herd of Herefords so there were always delicious beef dinners.

If you looked only at the big picture, you'd have to say we live in deeply troubled times. It seems we've never been more polarized. Political discourse feels more like a war zone than a thoughtful national conversation. But what happens when you zoom in closer?

Three collectors recently took home some unconventional offerings from Art Basel, a famous art show held annually in Miami Beach. Each artwork consisted of a banana duct-taped to a wall. Two sold for $120,000, one for $150,000.

When it comes to looting, organized crime has nothing on a far-from-trivial share of unelected “public servants” at the state and local levels. Theft, bribery, manipulation of compensation packages—it’s clear that many bureaucrats prioritize their greed over low-cost, high-quality services f…