History can mean different things to different people. For example, many people view history as what happened since they were born. Others take a longer view--such as the time frames of geology which stretch out over millions of years. I see the global warming issue as a blip in the reoccurring cycles of ice ages.

Consider these closing remarks by Cheryl Sedlacek from a 2003 paper, "The Great Glacier Controversy History of Geology": “Most scientists now concur that much of the topography of North America can be attributed to the most recent Ice Age, which ended about 10,000 years ago. At the height of the Ice Age, a sheet of ice covered the vast preponderance of North America, consisting of enough water to lower the sea level by 75 meters. The Earth has been subject to numerous Ice Ages, usually occurring every 150 million years, and lasting several million years. Although their existence is accepted almost universally, the cause of their propagation, and remission, is still a subject of great speculation.”

I find it interesting that while many scientists agree there have been ice ages, they really don’t know why they happen. The typical warm spell between ice ages (about 12,000 years) is drawing to a close. Only human beings have the arrogance to believe “they” can change the vast flow of geologic events.

JOHN LUKAN

Janesville

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