The desire for justice is inherent in all humans. There is at least some measure of satisfaction that comes to us when proven criminals get their comeuppance. This is especially true for victims of heinous crimes. Trying to bring this about, our country has had a justice department since 1780, and each state has its own DOJ.

But where is “justice” for the victims of Jeffery Epstein?

His premature death prevents even the possibility of ever hearing him admit his guilt or of publicly seeing him condemned for his monstrous crimes. And though his sins were so extreme, millions of people in parallel situations also feel that their plea for justice can never be adequately rendered.

Sadly, at least in this life, Epstein’s many victims will never experience any measure of justice. However, God’s word through St. Paul teaches that unrepentant sinners store up wrath against themselves for the day of God’s wrath when his righteous judgment will be revealed (Romans 2:5).

John Piper has a helpful comment on this: “Because God is just, all sins will be avenged, thoroughly and justly, either in hell or on the cross. The sins of the unrepentant will be avenged in hell; the sins of the repentant were avenged on the cross.”

Our courts may yield some sense of fairness for crime victims, but God is the ultimate judge (no investigations needed!), and we can trust him to do right. Believing that relieves us of bitterness and vengeful feelings towards those who have hurt us.

ROY C. ANDERSON

Janesville

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