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Improving care at Edgerton Hospital

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Greg Peck
June 18, 2013

Last December, disturbing news broke that problems at Edgerton Hospital triggered an investigation by the state Department of Health and Human Services and federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. That probe resulted in an “immediate jeopardy” label, meaning the violations endangered patients and that any repeat could cost the hospital its Medicare and Medicaid funding.

Investigators found that the hospital left patients in its emergency room without staff for nearly an hour overnight last Aug. 9 because of two cardiac emergencies elsewhere, one involving a nurse. The investigative report found the hospital failed to follow its policies for staffing nurses during more than a dozen night shifts, let respiratory emergency response training for some nurses lapse, sometimes turned down or off its 911 emergency scanner and failed to follow protocol for reporting the Aug. 9 nurse’s emergency.

Hospital officials assured residents that they had enacted policies and procedures to ensure that the problems didn’t recur.

Now, Edgerton Hospital has formed at three-year partnership with The Studer Group, the international consulting company formed by former Janesville resident Quint Studer. Coincidence? No, says the hospital's Patient Care Services Vice President Caryn Oleston. She told Gazette reporter Neil Johnson last week that the partnership was under development when last year’s problems arose and that the “jeopardy” label isn’t directly linked to that association.

Regardless, will the partnership with The Studer Group further raise the bar for quality patient care at Edgerton Hospital? How might it help?

We’ll share our perspectives in our editorial Wednesday.

Greg Peck can be reached at (608) 755-8278 or gpeck@gazettextra.com. Or follow him on Twitter or Facebook



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