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Tyne Daly stumps for Obama

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Frank Schultz
August 26, 2012

— Actress Tyne Daly lent her fame to the effort to re-elect the president with stops in southern Wisconsin on Saturday.

Daly was in Whitewater and Janesville, among other stops, touring in the “Obama for America Heartland Tour” recreational vehicle.

Janesville’s crowd of about 100 outside Democratic Party headquarters on East Milwaukee Street was the biggest in the 37 towns that the RV stopped at around the state, an organizer said.

Daly was on the tour for 17 stops. She was born in Madison, “but, full disclosure, I only stayed 26 days” before her parents moved to New York.

Her family is from Wisconsin Rapids and Superior. One grandfather worked in paper mills. Another was a Methodist minister.

As is typical for such events by both major parties, Daly fired up the friendly crowd and urged them to work harder than before:

“Both sides want exactly the same thing, but there’s two different techniques here. One side says it works from the top down. The other side it works from middle out. … That’s the middle class. We embrace each other, we work very hard together, we mind our own business, but if our neighbors need us, we say OK, I’m coming along,” she said.

“Your neighbors need you now. … to make one more effort, to work a little harder to get President Obama elected because he is a cool-headed, clear-eyed man, an intelligent man, an articulate man, who has held this country together, who has brought it back from the brink of disaster. He’s laid a great deal of wonderful groundwork. He needs four more years to continue that work.”

Daly was introduced by Sen. Jon Erpenbach, D-Middleton, and listened while local Democratic candidates—44th Assembly District candidate Debra Kolste and 1st Congressional District candidate Rob Zerban— gave short speeches.

Erpenbach urged local activists to reach out to the undecideds: “We need to talk to everybody. We need to not so much point our finger at the other side, but just stick to the facts. The facts are on our side.”

No one was there from the other side, whose members, of course, believe the facts are on their side.

Daly accepted hugs, signed autographs and chatted with supporters until all were satisfied.

Asked afterward why anyone should listen to an actress about politics, Daly said:

“They shouldn’t actually be listening to me,” she said, but her decades of work help her draw a crowd, “and if we can make a gathering, and they can hear from the real politicians and the people who do the real work, then we can make a difference, then that’s the service I can provide.”


 

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