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Spaniard ties Borg with 6th French title

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Associated Press
June 6, 2011
— Regardless of the setting or the surface, Rafael Nadal confounds Roger Federer the way no other man can.

Put the two greats of the game on opposite ends of a court in a Grand Slam final—particularly at Roland Garros, on the red clay that Nadal rules—and the one-sided nature of the rivalry grows even more pronounced.


Grinding along the baseline, using every inch of his wingspan to extend points, whipping fearsome forehands this way and that, Nadal flummoxed Federer yet again Sunday in a riveting, highlight-filled match, beating him 7-5, 7-6 (3), 5-7, 6-1 for a record-tying sixth French Open championship and 10th major title overall.


“He plays better against the better ones, and that’s what he showed today,” said Federer, owner of 16 Grand Slam trophies. “He’s a great champion, on clay, especially.”


There’s no question that Nadal is as good as it gets in Paris—45-1 for his career, and the same number of titles there as Bjorn Borg—but the Spaniard already also has shown that he is much more than the King of Clay. And Sunday’s victory only will raise more questions about whether Federer truly deserves to be called the Greatest of All Time if he is not even the Greatest of Right Now.


Nadal leads their head-to-head series 17-8. That includes a 6-2 advantage in Grand Slam finals and a 5-0 edge at the French Open (in the 2005 semifinals, and the 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2011 finals).


When a reporter recited those numbers and asked for an assessment, Nadal replied: “Well, it means I can play well, too.”


“When you talk about these statistics, when you try and make these comparisons, really it’s not very interesting to me,” continued Nadal, who would have ceded the No. 1 ranking to Novak Djokovic with a loss Sunday. “I’m very happy with what I have, with who I am. I’m not the best player in the history of tennis. I think I’m among the best. That’s true. That’s enough for me.”


He’s rapidly gaining on Federer. Nadal turned 25 Friday, making him about six months younger than Federer was when the Swiss star collected his 10th major title.


Their rivalry is a friendly one. Nadal conceded a point Sunday when he saw Federer’s shot landed in but was called out. A few years ago, Federer gave Nadal a lift on a private jet from one tournament site to another after learning his on-court nemesis had trouble finding a commercial flight.


This was their first meeting in a Grand Slam final in more than two years. It also was the first major championship match contested by any two men who already completed career Grand Slams. And Nadal and Federer put on a worthy show, more than 3½ hours chock-full of lengthy exchanges, brilliant defense, and dizzying shifts of momentum.


The only time Federer won the French Open, in 2009, he avoided Nadal, who was eliminated in the fourth round that year by Robin Soderling.


“I was able to play my best when I needed my best,” Nadal said. “For that reason, today I am here with the trophy.”



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