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Kedzie plans to seek re-election

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May 12, 2010
— Republican Sen. Neal Kedzie announced Tuesday he will seek another term in the 11th Senate District.

Kedzie, R-Elkhorn, said that if he’s re-elected he looks forward to serving in a Legislature that has turned Republican.


“The electorate is looking for some changes with more people these days tending to not identify themselves with any one particular party,” Kedzie said. “It’s important that no matter what position you’re running for, you need to be plugged in to the electorate.”


Kedzie said job creation is one of his top priorities.


“I find it very disturbing that for the first time in the history of Wisconsin, private sector jobs outnumber manufacturing jobs,” he said.


His platform also includes the environment, strengthening legislation on drunken driving and keeping the retiring community in Wisconsin.


Kedzie has authored several bills dealing with the environment and was at the forefront of the Great Lake Compact, which details how eight states—including Wisconsin—will manage use of water from the Great Lakes.


“I’ve also been trying to keep our retiring community in the state by reducing taxation on pensions and retirement income, so we can remain competitive with other states,” Kedzie said.


Kedzie is completing his second term in the district, which includes parts of Walworth, Waukesha, Jefferson and Kenosha counties. He also served in the state Assembly from 1996-2000.


Challenging Kedzie is Elkhorn resident L.D. “Red” Rockwell, 70, who said in February he would run on a platform of strengthening Wisconsin’s educational system and promoting a cleaner environment.


This is the second straight time Rockwell has challenged Kedzie.


Rockwell said limiting class size, adding teachers aides and reducing state government involvement in administration could improve schools.


Rockwell said the environment is important, too, and he favors clean waterways, renewable energy and reduced usage of coal-fired plants, especially on college campuses.



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