Janesville22.3°

Parkview referendum delayed

Print Print
GINA R. HEINE
June 16, 2009
— It isn't likely the Parkview School Board will go to referendum this fall.

Monday night, the board tabled a discussion about community survey results designed to help it make a decision about the referendum.


"We'll most likely wait," said Steve Lutzke, Parkview superintendent.


If the board decided in July to go to a referendum, it wouldn't have enough time to prepare for a fall vote.


At Monday's meeting, the district's consultant, Kit Dailey of Eppstein Uhen Architects, presented the survey information to the board. But the discussion was tabled so board members could review results.


Residents were asked to complete the 24-question survey last month on the district's Web site or in the school's Parkview Voice newspaper, which is mailed to the 2,700 households.


The district received 283 completed surveys, a response rate of about 10.5 percent, according to the summary by Dailey.


The district has identified three needs that could turn into three referendum questions: Operating expenses, maintenance and technology improvements.


Results of the survey show:


-- 58 percent are satisfied or very satisfied with the district overall; 36 percent are unsatisfied or very unsatisfied.


-- 48 percent said they would support a property tax increase of up to $138 per year (based on property value of $150,000) for general operating needs; 34 percent indicated they would not support it; 18 percent said they needed more information.


-- 53 percent said they would support a property tax increase of up to $34 per year for technology improvements; 28 percent said they would not; 19 percent said they needed more information.


-- 44 percent said they would support a property tax increase of up to $54 per year for facility projects; 29 percent said they would not; 28 percent said they needed more information.


-- 24 percent said the district should quickly move forward with a referendum this fall, requiring a special election at district expense; 34 percent said the district should wait until the regularly scheduled spring election; 19 percent said this is not a good time to consider a referendum for any reason.


Residents provided typically negative comments, particularly related to the economy and any tax increases, Dailey said in her summary. Frequent comments related to concerns about tax increases, spending, residents on fixed incomes, loss of jobs, teacher and leadership concerns, requests for more information, Newark School and poor facilities.



Print Print