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Class of 2008 graduates from UW-Whitewater

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Catherine W. Idzerda
May 18, 2008
— Never mind the job market.

Never mind the possibility of a recession.


Bring on the all-you-can-eat buffets.


On Saturday, 1,300 UW-Whitewater students crossed the stage of the DLK/Kachel Field house to pick up their diplomas.


Most graduates had their eyes firmly fixed on the future. And it didn’t worry them—or at least not much.


“Tomorrow, I’m going to Mexico,” said Douglas J. Nelson, a communications major from Delafield.


Mission trip? Job opportunity?


No, just vacation.


“I’m going to enjoy those all-you-can-eat buffets,” Nelson said.


Um, but what about a job?


“I’ve already got a job,” Nelson said. “I work in sales for Comcast.”


Even the arts graduates were hopeful.


Lindsey Slabik, a piano performance major from West Allis, was ready to spend a couple of years struggling in the 9-to-5 grind to reach her dream: Her own piano studio.


“I’m going to look for a job with insurance—like a $12 an hour office job and then start gathering piano students,” Slabik said.


Jessica VandeLeest, an art major from Racine, planned to make jewelry and start a family. Her husband provides the health insurance.


The students understood the law of supply and demand.


Karen Lucivansky Livingston, who was getting her master’s degree in special education, already had a job—she’s a special education teacher at Badger High School in Lake Geneva. State and national laws now require schools to at least make an effort to include children with emotional, physical and cognitive disablities in the public schools.


Amanda Miller, a social work major from Eagle, wants to work with juvenile delinquents. Fortunately for her, the supply of juvenile delinquents doesn’t show any sign of diminishing.


And Maria Riedel, who was getting her master’s degree in counseling, hoped to work as a school counselor.


Riedel, who is from Jefferson, is looking for jobs in 11 different states.


“Of course we’re concerned about the job market,” she said. “But our instructors have prepared us well.”



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