Janesville28.5°

Three in primary race for District 6

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Mike Heine
February 15, 2008

A newcomer challenges two incumbents in District 6, which encompasses most of Elkhorn and part of Sugar Creek Township.


Robert Grohall


Age: 65.


Address: 16 S. Jackson St., Elkhorn.


Job: Semi-retired. Self-employed servicing and selling automatic teller machines.


Education: Some college in metallurgy. Graduated from Boys Tech High School in Milwaukee.


Community service: President of the Men’s Club of the United Methodist Church in Elkhorn; 4-H science project judge.


Elected posts: none.


Q: What is the biggest issue facing the county board today?


A: “I think the biggest issue facing the county board today is health insurance and taxes … The county should not be self-insured, but looking for competitive bids for their insurance (company).”


“Taxes, as a conservative, I’ll watch how tax dollars are spent. I think the tax increase was too high last year.”


Q: Should Walworth County continue offering non-mandated services such as a school for children with disabilities, a nursing home, county zoning, etc.? Why or why not?


A: “I would say yes. I think that (Lakeland Health Care Center) is necessary in the county. The old people that don’t have any place to go now have someplace to go. That is a proper expenditure of county dollars.


Q: What are some ways Walworth County can manage the burden on taxpayers?


A: Containing costs of employee health insurance is important.


“I think that’s the issue facing any employer today. That could be a huge cost coming up.”


Larry Hilbelink


Age: 61.


Address: 215 S. Washington St., Elkhorn.


Job: Retired sheriff’s deputy, currently a teaching assistant at Elkhorn Area High School.


Education: Graduated from South High School in Denver; some college.


Community service: Elkhorn Lions Club.


Elected posts: Walworth County supervisor 2002-present.


Q: What is the biggest issue facing the county board today?


A: “The transition from 25 to 11 (supervisors). It’s going to be awfully difficult, I think, to transition down that far. It’s going to be a new way of doing business.


“Historically, Wisconsin has always had large boards to tromp over the same old path. When we’re talking about the majority being six people, the complexion of the county board may change considerably from what it is now.”


Q: Should Walworth County continue offering non-mandated services such as a school for children with disabilities, a nursing home, county zoning, etc.? Why or why not?


A: “I think so. Traditionally, we’ve taken care of our young and we’ve taken care of our old. We have facilities to do that. Taxpayers have been more than generous in keeping those programs growing … Unless something drastically changes in the future, I think Walworth County will continue to do that.”


Q: What are some ways Walworth County can manage the burden on taxpayers?


A: “We’ve done a great job over the last six years of reducing (in) the county as far as combining programs and reducing the number of people that work for us.


“We’re coming close to having a really great county program, but there is still some work to be done. That’s why I’m hoping not only myself, but some of the other supervisors who have been on the ground floor will be able to continue in the direction we’re going.”


Kathy Ingersoll


Age: 63.


Address: 303 Randall Place, Elkhorn


Job: Retired nurse. Cook for Elkhorn Rotary and Kiwanis clubs.


Education: Nursing degree from Madison Area Technical College.


Community service: Assistant to the women’s minister at Calvary Community Church.


Elected posts: Walworth County supervisor 2006-present.


Q: What is the biggest issue facing the county board today?


A: “Probably taxes. People are always concerned about the tax base and where we go with that. Being that we have the school and the nursing home, other mandated issues and other (services) by choice, I feel it’s being managed well. I really do.


“The everyday hardworking taxpayer doesn’t totally understand the effort that goes into making a budget work for Walworth County. I trust the people that work very hard under different departments who sharpen their pencils over and over again to make it work.”


Q: Should Walworth County continue offering non-mandated services such as a school for children with disabilities, a nursing home, county zoning, etc.? Why or why not?


A: “As far as the nursing home and the school goes, I feel we need to continue those. That has been a big plus to our county over the years. We’ve worked hard to making them work.


“With two new buildings, it would be a shame for the county to pull the plug on either program.”


Q: What are some ways Walworth County can manage the burden on taxpayers?


A: “It’s the benefit areas that we can cut back on.


“Insurance has gone way out of control. Companies themselves can no longer be responsible, or the county, for benefits like it used to be. (Employees) will have to take responsibility.”



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