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Reporter’s ‘inventory’ turns out to be prophetic

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ANN MARIE AMES
November 19, 2007

We thought it was funny when I took an interests inventory to find out what career I should choose.


“It’ll probably say ‘botanist,’” said my editor, Sid Schwartz.


We laughed even harder when I got the results and “reporter” topped the list of my 10 strongest career choices. Even Marylee Kishel, coordinator of adult student services at UW-Rock County, was surprised it came out that close.


The results said I also could make a good librarian, public relations director or special education teacher.


I would not, apparently, make a good athletic trainer or mathematician.


To take the test, I called Kishel to get the log in information. The test took about 15 minutes online and cost $10.


I answered questions about how much I would or wouldn’t like to spend time with certain people. It asked how I would react in some situations and how interested I was in various activities.


When I was done, the results were sent electronically to Kishel, who went over them with me by appointment.


My “occupational themes” were artistic, social and investigative.


In this case, “social” means being interested in people and social issues, not being chatty at work.


My interest in writing and politics ranked “very high” compared to other women. Nature and agriculture made my top five interests, which might explain my farming and environment blog on Gazettextra.com.


I got a “very low” in taxes and accounting, which might explain the state of my checkbook.


My “style” in the workplace was described as team oriented and academic.


I scored exactly in the middle between being a leader and a follower.


The results were surprisingly accurate and fun to read. For someone who’s not sure where his or her career is going, it could be a little inspiration.


For me it was affirmation that I’m right where I should be.


And that, according the Strong Interest Inventory, I don’t value “tradition, practicality or common sense.”


Read more about interest inventories at UW-Rock County

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