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Other Views: Budget proposal would devastate UW athletics
Gov. Scott Walker's budget proposal would not only be detrimental to every student organization in the UW System. It would irreversibly damage every NCAA Division III athletic program in Wisconsin.
Other Views: Don’t start school until after Sept. 1
The importance of protecting vacation time during the month of August in Wisconsin comes down to weather and traditions.
Other Views: Trump budget cuts would cripple state spending
The state would have to raise state taxes or cut state government services if President Trump's proposed budget were adopted by Congress, according to a new report.
Other Views: Killing state magazine is a bad idea
Many people have asked me about Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal, in his 2017-19 budget, to eliminate the magazine I used to work for, Wisconsin Natural Resources.
Other Views: Overcharging seniors won’t fix health care
The American Health Care Act would impose an “age tax” on Americans, meaning people in their 50s and 60s who are buying health insurance on their own might have to pay up to $8,400 per year more than they do now.
Walters: A transportation plan from 2011 gets new look
Once upon a time, Gov. Scott Walker offered a long-term funding plan for highways, bridges and other statewide transportation projects.
Other Views: Faced with resistance, Enbridge plays games
More than 200 activists united on that belief in Whitewater on March 11 to make our voices heard in the march against pipeline expansion, opposing a proposed pipeline that would run through Wisconsin.
Other Views: Proposal not about micromanaging City Hall
The cost for consultants is showing no signs of slowing down, and Janesville City Council member Jens Jorgensen has a proposal for monitoring these expenses.
Other Views: Rumors of Janesville’s fiscal demise exaggerated
The city of Janesville is in good financial standing, despite comments about it being "broke."
Walters: Record $28.1 million spent on legislative campaigns
An analysis shows the biggest winners of new campaign laws were wealthy contributors, corporations and legislative leaders who run their party's campaign committees.